2.3.2. Automated reporting

2.3.2. Automated reporting

The psychological report is often prepared by the psychologist themselves, but increasing use is also being made of reports that are partly or fully automated. When using automated reports, the psychologist involved should be aware of the rules of interpretation that are used in reporting. If automated combinations of scores are calculated in a report – for example, by translating scores on a personality test into competency scores – then the psychologist should ascertain how this calculation has been done.

In looking at a score, the psychologist should be able to give the client both an oral and written explanation of how the automated report has been drawn up (see Article 67, “Access to and copy of the File”, and Article 91, “Opportunity to inspect the Report before it is issued”). As noted above, it is important that, even when digital instruments and automatically generated reports are used, it is clear to the client and the psychologist which norm group is being used.

Finally, answers and raw scores on psychodiagnostic instruments are increasingly being stored digitally, and only scale scores are reported. The psychologist should, however, be able to take a look at the answers and the raw scores, possibly at the level of each answer. The client, too, has the right to inspect his scores: this data belongs, after all, to the file (see Article 1.14, “File”, and Article 67, “Access to and copy of the File”).