2.2.8.d. Test-taking procedure: quality of the test material

2.2.8.d. Test-taking procedure: quality of the test material

When a psychologist administers a particular test, they must make sure that it is in its original, or the intended, state. When the test is taken in a worse state than was intended – for instance, when the copies of a questionnaire are hard to read – this can have a negative impact on the test results, besides which there might be a violation of copyright (see Article 99, “Knowledge of legal provisions”). In this case, the instrument measures not only the target characteristic, but also how well a candidate is able to deal with the reduced legibility of the questions. In this context, it is also important to note that care is advisable in the conversion of a traditional paper-and-pencil task to a computer task. In the case of cognitive tasks, for instance, such as pointing out the largest circle on a screen, the brightness, sharpness and size of the screen can play a role in the test performance. It is important to pay attention to standardised test-taking, in which the testing conditions are as close to those in which the norms for the instrument have been collected. Care should be taken that differences in test performance are not caused by deviations in the material presented (see also the case set out in BOX 10).